The importance of stakeholders mapping and engagement in KEE development

The importance of stakeholders mapping and engagement in KEE development

Indonesia - 09 May, 2019

On Wednesday, May 8, 2019, Director of Tropenbos Indonesia (TI), Edi Purwanto, discussed new TI's Policy Brief entitled “Conservation Outside of Protected Areas: Lessons from West Kalimantan” with the Directorate of Essential Ecosystem Areas (Kawasan Ekosistem Esensial/KEE) Management (BPKEE), Directorate General of Conservation Areas and Ecosystem, Ministry of Environment and Forestry.

The meeting was led by Tandya Cahyono (Director of BPKEE) and attended by all key staffs. The objective is to highlight key issues of the Policy Brief to enrich the current draft of the Ministry decree on KEE which is planned to be issued in June 2019 or its technical implementation guideline.   
 
The draft seems to overlook the importance of stakeholder mapping and consultations prior the establishment of multi stakeholder’s platform (MSP), considering that most KEE areas is located in production landscape outside state forest area (APL), which could be thousand hectare managed by several leaseholders (HGU) or only tens hectare owned by single or several land owners.  As such, KEE establishment should be relied on bottom-up rather than top-down initiatives. Roles of the government are to identify the potential areas, assess best-management practices that effectively combine production and conservation objectives, initiating and facilitating the process and provide incentives mechanism.
 
Refer to the drat of the decree, KEE planning (Part 1, verse 9) is composed of ; (a) Identification and inventory KEE candidates; (b) MSP establishment; (c) KEE delineation; (d) Proposed KEE areas;   (e) Legal KEE designation; (f) KEE Management.  Stakeholders mapping and intensive awareness of stakeholders might, through door-to-door awareness rising/approaches, need to be added prior MSP establishment.
 
Too many established MSP failed to take actions, others are short-lived and highly dependent on external funding. The underlined causes is lack of awareness/engagement process prior the establishment. As such, KEE promoters (local government or CSOs) should be able to develop common binding issues which can reconcile and integrate multi-stakeholders’ interest, and this should be conducted to all stakeholders (either proponents or opponents), prior MSP establishment.
 
Lessons from West Kalimantan, In 2017, Province government and IDH Foundation successfully stimulated several palm oil companies in Ketapang to provide commitment to work together in managing their HCV/HCS areas and to establish a KEE. The key business stakeholders were proud and enthusiastic to manage a part of their production landscape as a wildlife corridor but they failed to adequately involve a mining company that had a concession in the same area. When the mining company started its operations in 2018, the KEE was in jeopardy. 
 
 
Stakeholder mapping, awareness and consultation at the beginning of the process are keys to dictate the success and failures of the following stages of KEE establishment. This should also include Forest Management Unit (KPH), which holds role and capacity on forest management at site level and village governments which guarantee the execution of KEE management actions at the ground level (EP).
 
Read the policy brief here